Wednesday, June 13, 2007

Commentaries Starter Kit

Want to begin to collect commentaries but don't know where to start? Here are just a few to get you going:


Genesis:


NIV Application Commentary on Genesis by John Walton

Exodus:

Exodus by John Currid

Leviticus:

Leviticus by John Currid

Psalms:

Psalms: Three Volumes by James M. Boice

Proverbs:

Proverbs by Charles Bridges
Proverbs by Tremper Longman

Song of Songs:

Song of Songs by Richard Hess

Isaiah:

The Prophecy of Isaiah by J.A. Motyer
God Saves Sinners by Ray Ortlund


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Matthew:

Matthew by Craig Blomberg
Matthew by Leon Morris

Mark:

Gospel According to Mark
by James Edwards

Luke:

NIV Application Commentary on Luke by Darrell Bock
Luke by Robert Stein

John:

The Gospel According to John by DA Carson

Acts:

Acts by Darrell Bock (forthcoming)

Romans:

The Epistle to the Romans by Douglas Moo
The Justification of God by John Piper

1 Corinthians:

The First Epistle to the Corinthians by Gordon Fee
The NIV Application Commentary on 1st Corinthians by Craig Blomberg

Ephesians:

The Letter to the Ephesians by Peter T. O'Brien

Hebrews:

Hebrews by John Owen
Hebrews: An Anchor for the Soul by R. Kent Hughes

James:


The Letter of James by Douglas Moo

11 comments:

  1. BTW, Gordon Fee is in process of revising his commentary on 1 Corinthians.

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  2. How big are your libraries? Do they take up a whole room? To have a commentary on each book almost requires it, unless you get the ebooks.

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  3. Good list, thanks! Any thoughts on Victor Hamilton's commentary on Genesis? I've been thinking of picking it up.

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  4. Mathetes said...
    Good list, thanks! Any thoughts on Victor Hamilton's commentary on Genesis? I've been thinking of picking it up.

    **********

    It's one of the standard commentaries on Genesis. Detailed. Fairly conservative. Strong on comparative semitics. Makes some connections with the NT.

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  5. Logos software is cheaper. It also does automatic footnotes when you cut and paste.

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  6. I posted this several threads ago. I hope this isn't annoying : ) Do any you of you recommend/not recommend "Every Thought Captive" by Pratt? I have looked for a good review but have been found wanting. Thanks for your time.

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  7. mv said:

    I posted this several threads ago. I hope this isn't annoying : ) Do any you of you recommend/not recommend "Every Thought Captive" by Pratt? I have looked for a good review but have been found wanting. Thanks for your time.

    *******************************

    It's probably the best entry level introduction to Van Tilian apologetics.

    At some point it would need to be supplemented by Bahnsen's magnum opus on Van Til's Apologetic, as well as Frame's material.

    Also, bookmark the following website:

    http://www.vantil.info/

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  8. Thank you good sir - very helpful.

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  9. Anonymous asked:
    ---
    How big are your libraries? Do they take up a whole room? To have a commentary on each book almost requires it, unless you get the ebooks.
    ---

    My personal library is fairly big, but only a small percentage of it is on bookshelves. It's mostly stored in boxes in my garage that I rummage through when I need a specific book. I also had a bunch of stuff on ebooks, but I prefer reading the real thing.

    But books don't really take up as much space as you seem to think they do :-) For instance, I have all of Calvin's Commentaries and it just barely takes up one bookshelf. To get a commentary on each book of the Bible wouldn't fill up an entire book case, let alone an entire room.

    The "problem" is that when you own commentaries on every book in the Bible, commentaries aren't the ONLY books you buy! :-) For instance, 90% of one of my bookcases (before I moved--it's all in boxes now) was the commentaries of Calvin, his institutes (in two versions), the sermons of Martin Luther, the sermons of Spurgeon, six English Bibles (NASB, ESV, NKJV, KJV, NIV, NAB), a Greek NT and Hebrew OT, two Spanish translations of the Bible, the New World "Translation" (JW), and the Mormon "Quad" (Book of Mormon, Pearl of Great Price, Doctrines and Covenants, and KJV). Next to that were several works by modern theologians, such as James White, RC Sproul, AW Pink, JI Packer, etc. Oh yeah, and Josh Waitzkin's "Attacking Chess" (you know, just to throw people off).

    So commentaries themselves aren't that big; but they're not the only thing you end up with :-)

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  10. Peter said:

    Oh yeah, and Josh Waitzkin's "Attacking Chess" (you know, just to throw people off).

    So commentaries themselves aren't that big; but they're not the only thing you end up with :-)


    Speaking of throwing people off, I have a comic book collection which may outstrip my theological and biblical library. It includes modern classics such as The Dark Knight Returns and Watchmen. Apart from Miller and Moore, I'm also a fan of contemporary writers like Bendis, Loeb, and Straczynski.

    Just kidding about my comic book collection. For better or for worse, I don't actually have one (anymore). Although, as you can tell, I am still a "true believer"! :-)

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  11. hostus twinkius6/14/2007 12:17 AM

    Listen, I know it's a starter kit for commentaries, but you missed a lot of prophets. Try Bruce Waltke on Micah...

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